September 7, 2007

Etro

End of Summer but before the beginning of Autumn, these days it seems too late to wear light summer perfumes but not quite time for the more powerful ones appropriate to colder weather. I have a number of Etro samples, and because they are Eau de Toilettes and Colognes, and designed to be layered, and are comprised of a range of disparate elements that are fresh, earthy, creamy, woody and sweet, they are perfect for this time of year. It's like a description of what is going on in nature and with the weather, even in the city. Still sometimes hot and humid, the sun is setting sooner every day and the streets cool down quickly at night. There is starting to be a tiny amount of leaf litter at the edges of the streets but the heavy daytime light and warmth keep things in a golden and crisp blue palette. Some say Italian perfumes emphasize classic beauty, valuing a sense of balance and pleasantness that doesn't aim for that edge of strangeness French perfumes pull off so often and so well (the Classic rather than the Romantic ideal I suppose). These days though, I am in the mood to visit such unclouded Italianate pleasantness; taking a walk through a landscape background in a painting by Raphael seems like an idyllic Summer's end. Etro has been well reviewed, and my samples are not new releases, so there is no need for me to go into exacting descriptions. The notes are thoroughly and clearly delineated in charming Italianate English on the sample cards.

Obviously we each have very individual body chemistry that brings out different aspects of perfumes, and when there is a high component of natural essences as there are in Etro, the result will be even more different on each person, because natural essences tend to combine more closely with our own skin's scent. I don't think there are any aldehydes or deliberately chemical effects in the Etro line at all.

I have a small pouch that I carry with me in my handbag and I stock it with a selection of small perfume samples. Because the Etro fragrances work so well together, I can take them all with me and use different ones during the course of the day, reapplying on separate areas such as the wrists and the neck, which layers the effects. Personally I find Heliotrope becomes predominantly vanilla with rosy jasmine on me, while others have mentioned an almond candy sweetness that I don't get at all. Sandalo, on the other hand, I find very transparent as to be almost invisible, but I think layering it with Heliotrope and Shaal Nur, which is intensely amber for me, with a citrusy top note, works together harmoniously. Patchouly with its spike of bergamot is also a good addition. Royal Pavilion is sweeter than I usually like, but the fruitiness tones and lifts into Etro Etro, which otherwise would be too elegantly gentlemanly on me for my taste. As to generally masculine effects, Vetiver is my favorite of them all, surprisingly intense and true to the source material of vetiver itself, for a cologne. Since these fragrances do not throw much sillage it is not untoward to engage in this kind of layering and reapplication even if going into a public or work environment. I plan on carrying this Etra selection with me through September, and then I think I will have to seriously consider going for a full size of Vetiver...
Here is a link to Etro's website, which gives a comprehensive look at all their collections Above, Etro paisley printed fabric...

1 comment:

Colleen Shirazi said...

I like some of the Etro scents too and feel they layer well. Heliotrope is one of my favorite layers (I get the almond, but it's dry on me rather than candylike). Shaal Nur is a nice one for crisp weather.