July 3, 2006

Exfoliation - Emerging Renewed

Lacebark pine pictured above (Reiman Gardens, Iowa State University) 
Gentleness is the word to keep in mind for exfoliation. Personally, I am not one for chemical peels or dermabrasion as my skin is too thin and sensitive. The skin does seem to need some help at times, especially in the years between adolescence and mature years.  I find that if a regular practice of exfoliation is done as simple maintenance, it's much less wearing on the skin.

As for the face,  as simple way to attain smoothness is to wash weekly with a mixture of baking soda powder moistened with a mild cleansing lotion, or plain water, applied with the softest facial brush obtainable, or simply the fingers.

This treatment calms redness or inflammation and acts as a very mild form of dermabrasion. It also seems to prevent that slight peeling that sometimes occurs in the corner of the nose and between the eyebrows and to calm breakouts.

The use of real soap on the face is too harsh and causes breakouts or over drying or other trouble. Using a mild cleansing product on the face for about thirty seconds lifts the dead cells and conditions the skin.

For oiliness or balancing, a simple clay mask once a week lifts impurities and smooths and reveals the newer skin cells. Isn't it said that we replace our skin completely over the course of seven years? The trick is to preserve suppleness and smoothness during this process over time.

Body exfoliation can be accomplished in several ways but unfortunately so many commercial products contain rough ingredients such as ground nutshells. On the body the soft roughness of a thick cotton washcloth or natural sponge with a mild natural soap is generally enough.

Before bathing, dry brushing with a very soft natural bristle brush over the entire body, working into the heart area from the extremities stimulates circulation and therefore brightens and polishes the skin.
A daily vigorous exfoliation is required for the feet and sometimes the elbows, and natural pumice stone or very textured loofah is a safe method.

As with the lacebark pine pictured above (Reiman Gardens, Iowa State University) or sycamore and birch trees, "normal" skin exfoliates by itself to reveal the newer and smoother skin below as part of the natural process of regeneration and replacement. For dry or oily skin, or a combination of both, this process is somewhat slowed and even blocked, and it's good to help it along in the most gentle ways possible to accomplish the desired results.

Copyright 2006, Lucy Raubertas, All Rights Reserved

6 comments:

Kala said...

I wish I would spend more time on my skin - much more - I spend so much time in the salt waters of the ocean and under the sun - although my skin is on the darker side, I could definitely use sun screen more often - thats interesting about the baking powder - baking powder seems to be useful for a lot of things. I like how you used the scaling tree bark as the pic for this very appropriate posting. =)
When I go for my hair cut, my stylist gives me a mini facial and finished it with a hot face cloth to open the pores - it feels amazing and the product she uses is Aveda line natural thingies so it is not too harsh on the facial skin

Edwin Sumun said...

thank you for the links. I'll have such a wonderful time reading them. makes a change from the DP blogs. and you reminded me about my face...haven't exfoliated for months. like you, my skin is sensitive and your tips will come in handy when I get back home.

Lucy said...

Yes, Kala, I like the Avena products too, I just got a Geranium Bourbon oil extract that can be used on the face which has a wonderful smell (more an antiaging thing). I think carrying a couple of products with you in your bag than you can put on as you go about your business, such as a tinted face moisturizer with sunblock is beneficial - L'Occitane has one SPF 15 with Shea butter and tinted in different shades that has no junk in it...
Edwin, yes, we sensitive faces must be careful but we still need as much care if not more than the others...
I am planning on making a separate page of links to products that I like and know personally and can feel good about recommending, but I have to consult with someone technically to get that going. I hope to have it up this summer or as soon as possible...
Thanks for your encouragement, it really does encourage...

Andrea said...

Luccia, thanks so much for your comments I was really touched, my trip was quite an unforgetable experience.I love your post of today I totally feel like I just went threw an exfoliation and a renewal prosses but inside....love reading your stuff...have a great summer...

bob said...

This is extremely thorough. Is that a plane tree- great analogy

Brian said...

No, Bob, it's a lacebark pine. Similar bark effect to the london plane tree aka sycamore, but it has more colors, green pink and light cream tan and is a little smoother, very very ornamental, people use it becaue of the peeling away of layers of bark...